Monday, September 20, 2021
The Best Muscle Workouts


5 Resistance Band Workouts from Top Trainers

Whether you’re a fitness newbie or a seasoned workout buff, incorporating resistance bands into your routine can help improve your…

By admint10m , in Legs , at September 8, 2021

728x90-3

Whether you’re a fitness newbie or a seasoned workout buff, incorporating resistance bands into your routine can help improve your strength and stave off boredom. With resistance bands, you can get an effective full-body workout without leaving the house or breaking the bank.

Resistance bands range in size, strength, and length. They come in various forms, but the most common are flat bands, mini bands (or loops), and tubing. The stretchiness of a band determines how much resistance it offers.

In general, bands in darker colors like black and blue are tighter, providing more resistance. Yellow and green, on the other hand, are stretchy, so they’re a better fit for beginners. Bands are available as closed loops, with handles, or as flat therapy bands that do not loop.

We asked five top trainers to share their favorite resistance band exercises for the arms, legs, glutes, core, and back. You can do each workout individually for a mini workout or combine them for an excellent at-home full-body routine.

If you’re looking to add variety to your workouts, increase your strength, and promote functional fitness, then resistance band training is a great place to start.

Resistance bands are safe for people at most ages and fitness levels. In fact, one study found that elastic-band resistance exercises can improve balance, gait function, and flexibility in older adults (1).

Plus, using this fitness tool for resistance can promote similar strength gains compared to conventional resistance training, according to a research review (2).

That said, if you’re on the fence about adding resistance bands to your fitness routine, consider these additional benefits (1, 3):

  • Resistance bands come in a variety of strengths, lengths, and sizes.
  • They’re foldable, portable, and easy to store.
  • They are one of the most affordable pieces of exercise equipment.
  • Resistance bands allow you to do gym-type exercises at home.
  • You’ll get resistance in both directions of your movement, in both the concentric and eccentric phase of the exercise (in other words, when both contracting and lengthening the muscle).
  • The resistance is variable and can accommodate different ranges of motion.
  • You can move in different planes and pull in all different directions with a resistance band.
  • Resistance bands increase the time your muscles are under tension.
  • Bands come in a variety of styles, including mini bands, loop bands, tube bands with handles, flat therapy bands, and figure 8 bands.

Want to give resistance band training a go but aren’t sure where to start? Check out these five mini-workouts designed by top certified personal trainers.

Ridge Davis, a National Council on Strength and Fitness certified personal trainer from West Hollywood, California, is highly sought after by high profile clients and Hollywood’s top executives.

With more than a decade of fitness experience and 20,000 clocked personal training hours, this PUMA-endorsed athlete is a pro at designing exercise routines for all fitness levels.

His training approach delivers sustainable transformations by educating clients on fitness, nutrition, and wellness. Plus, he has hosted virtual workouts with Vital Proteins, Puma, Amazon, and Hollywood Life and has collaborated with Fabletics and GLO.

Superman pull

Type of band: mini band

Using a mini band when performing the Superman pull adds resistance and increases the tension on your lower back muscles, glutes, and core.

  1. Place the mini band around your wrists.
  2. Lie facedown with your arms straight in front of you and legs straight behind you.
  3. Maintaining a neutral neck and keeping your gaze on the floor, reach your arms and legs off the floor. Pause for a moment before pulling your elbows to your sides, making a W shape with your arms.
  4. Return to reaching your arms in front of you to complete 1 rep.
  5. Do 2 sets of 10–15 reps.

Bent-over single-arm row

Type of band: mini band

The bent-over single-arm row targets your lats, rear shoulder muscles, and biceps. This unilateral exercise is a great addition to a back workout or full-body routine.

  1. Place the band around your foot and hold the opposite end of the band in your hand on the same side.
  2. Hinge at your hip and keep your lower back straight. Your palm should face your torso.
  3. Engage your core and pull the band straight up to the side of your chest. Make sure to keep your upper arm close to your side.
  4. Contract your back muscles (lats) at the top of the movement. Slowly lower to the starting position and repeat.
  5. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps on each side.

Single-arm lat pulldown

Type of band: mini band

The lat pulldown is a popular back exercise that’s easy to do at home using a resistance band. To increase the focus on your lats, try performing the move one side at a time.

  1. Grab the band in both palms.
  2. Reach forward and 45 degrees upward. This will be your starting position.
  3. Pull the band down on one side, squeezing your elbow to your side as you flex the elbow.
  4. Pause at the bottom of the movement, and then slowly return the handle to the starting position and repeat.
  5. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps on each side.

Reach and pull

Type of band: mini band

Including exercises like the reach and pull that target the smaller muscles in your upper back and rear shoulders can improve your posture and help with stabilization when performing compound movements like deadlifts.

  1. Place the mini band around your wrists.
  2. Stand with your feet hip-width apart with knees and hips slightly bent.
  3. Reach your arms forward, keeping arms shoulder-width apart and pressing outward into the band.
  4. Keeping your wrists shoulder-width apart, pull your elbows back toward your ribs.
  5. Pull your shoulders behind your ears and squeeze your shoulder blades together.
  6. Reach forward, and then repeat from the top.
  7. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps.

Nehemiah Owusu is a National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) certified personal trainer at Life Time in Plymouth, Minnesota.

In addition to a personal training certificate, Owusu holds a corrective exercise specialist (CES) certification and a performance enhancement specialist (PES) certification.

Banded squat

Type of band: superband

Using a resistance band for the squat is a great alternative to dumbbells or a barbell for targeting the quadriceps and glutes.

  1. Wrap a long loop resistance band around your feet and over your shoulders to add resistance to the movement.
  2. Stand with feet flat, hip- to shoulder-width apart, and either pointed straight ahead or angled outward an inch or two.
  3. Bend at your hips and knees to lower your body with control until the crease of your hip is in line with the top of your knee.
  4. Try to maintain a neutral spine (flat back) and an engaged core the entire time. Keep your hips, knees, and feet aligned as well.
  5. After reaching proper depth, push the floor away with your feet, reversing the movement until you’re back to the starting position.
  6. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps.

Bulgarian split squat

Type of band: superband

The Bulgarian split squat not only targets your quadriceps and glutes but also challenges and improves hip and core stability in a unilateral way.

  1. Loop one end of a resistance band around your lead foot. Loop the other end of the resistance band over your shoulders and behind/below your neck.
  2. Place your non-looped foot behind you on an elevated platform, such as a box, bench, or chair.
  3. Bend at your lead hip and knee, lowering your body with control until front thigh is parallel with the floor.
  4. Press through your lead foot to return to the starting position.
  5. Try to maintain a neutral spine (flat back) and strong core the entire time. Keep your hip, knee, and foot aligned as well. Most of your weight should be on your front leg.
  6. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps.

Hip thrust

Type of band: superband

The hip thrust targets the powerful glute muscles, which Owusu says are fundamental for movement and performance. The hamstrings and core are also used during the banded hip thrust.

  1. Loop one end of a resistance band underneath each foot. Take the middle section of the folded band and draw it up over your hips (it should also wrap around your legs).
  2. Place your upper back on an elevated platform such as a bench, box, or chair, with your hips extended (forming a straight line from shoulders to knees), feet flat, and knees bent at 90 degrees.
  3. Maintaining a neutral spine (flat back) and engaged core, lower your butt toward the floor by bending at your hips.
  4. Once you’ve lowered to just above the floor, drive your feet into the floor and hips toward the ceiling until you’ve returned to the starting position.
  5. Make sure to squeeze your glutes and abs at the top.
  6. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 repetitions.

Romanian deadlift

Type of band: superband

This lower body exercise will work your glutes, your hamstrings, and the postural muscles of your entire spine and back.

  1. Hold one end of a looped resistance band in each hand. For extra challenge, you can wrap the ends of the band around the backs of your wrists and through the index finger and thumb of the fronts of your hands. Stand on the middle of the band, where it’s folded.
  2. Start standing with a tall upright posture with arms at your sides.
  3. Hinge (bend) at your hips while keeping a neutral spine and an engaged core. Keep your knees soft, but don’t bend any more than just enough to unlock your legs.
  4. Hinge until you’ve gone as low as you can while keeping a flat back (45–100 degrees for most people).
  5. Reverse the movement until you’ve returned to the starting position.
  6. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps.

Dean Seda, a NASM certified personal trainer, certified Zumba instructor, and Gympass advisor based in Jersey City, New Jersey, has more than 10 years of experience along with a master’s degree in sports management and a bachelor’s degree in exercise science.

Seda is known for designing routines that incorporate the physical, emotional, and psychological components of fitness. Plus, his love for dance makes him an excellent Zumba instructor.

Single-arm triceps pushdown

Type of band: mini band

The triceps muscle is located on the back of your upper arm. By using a resistance band to do the single-arm triceps pushdown, you place tension on this muscle throughout the movement.

  1. Place your right arm through a loop band and place the band on your right shoulder.
  2. Hold the band down at your right shoulder with your left hand and grab the band below with your right hand.
  3. Starting with your right arm flexed, push the band down until your arm is straight.
  4. Bring the band back into a flexed position and repeat.
  5. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps on each side.

Overhead press

Type of band: exercise tubing

Resistance bands with handles allow you to perform exercises like the overhead press, which targets your shoulders and triceps.

  1. Step on a resistance band with both feet, holding one handle in each hand.
  2. Start with the handles at your shoulders.
  3. Press both handles over your head until your arms are straight, and then slowly lower
    them back to the starting position. If needed, you can reduce the amount of resistance by stepping on the band with one foot instead of both feet.
  4. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps.

Kneeling single-arm biceps curl

Type of band: mini band

Performing a bicep curl in a kneeling position places a greater emphasis on the biceps muscle and recruits the core muscles for stability.

  1. Start with your left knee down and right knee up. Place a loop band around your right foot.
  2. Grab the band with your right hand and bring your right arm to the right side, keeping arm straight.
  3. Flex your elbow and bring the band toward your right shoulder, keeping your arm stationary by your side. Return your arm to a straight position and repeat.
  4. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps on each side.

Standing biceps curl

Type of band: mini band

The standing curl places tension on the biceps muscle, which is located on the front of your arm.

  1. Step on a resistance band with both feet. Start with the handles at your sides and your arms straight.
  2. Keeping your elbows tight to your body, flex your elbows and bring the handles
    toward your shoulders.
  3. Pause at the top of the movement, then lower to the starting position. If needed, you can reduce the amount of resistance by stepping on the band with one foot instead of both feet.
  4. Do 2–3 sets of 10–15 reps.

Michele Canon, a NASM-CPT and XPRO instructor for STRIDE GO, has been a certified personal trainer for 15 years in Pasadena, California.

In addition to personal training, Cannon offers nutrition coaching and has extensive experience in competitive athletics, including tennis, marathons, triathlons, and Spartan races.

Side crunch

Type of band: mini band

Side crunches work your abs and, more specifically, the internal and external obliques located on the sides of your torso.

  1. Place the band around the tops of your feet.
  2. Lie on your right side with your right arm extended in front of your chest and your left hand lightly resting behind your left ear.
  3. Using your right arm as a lever, prop yourself up onto your elbow while you drive your left knee in toward your left elbow.
  4. Return to the starting position and repeat. To make this move more difficult, you can hover both legs off the floor.
  5. Do 10–15 reps per side.

Bicycle crunch

Type of band: mini band

For an overall abdominal workout, try the bicycle crunch. This old-school exercise activates the rectus abdominis and obliques.

  1. Place the band around the tops of your feet.
  2. Lie on your back and bring both legs to a 90-degree position with knees bent. Make sure your knees are stacked on top of your hips.
  3. Place your hands gently behind your head and lift your shoulders and upper back off the floor. Be sure not to pull on your neck.
  4. Rotate your torso so your right elbow meets your left knee, fully extending your right leg. Return to center and repeat on the opposite side.
  5. Do 20–30 reps.

Knee tuck

Type of band: mini band

This exercise is great for working your lower abs.

  1. Place the band around the tops of your feet.
  2. From a high plank position, drive one knee in toward your chest. As you do so, draw your navel to your spine and tuck your tailbone under.
  3. Repeat with the other leg.
  4. Do 20 reps.

Plank side tap and lift

Type of band: mini band

The plank side tap and lift is great for core stability. It also works your glutes.

  1. Place the band around your ankles.
  2. From a plank position on your elbows, slowly tap one foot out to the side, return to center, and then lift that same leg up, leading with your heel. Be sure you keep your toes flexed and contract your glutes on each leg lift.
  3. Do 10–15 reps per side.

Holly Roser, owner of Holly Roser Fitness in San Francisco, California, has 15 years of experience and 10 certifications, including NASM certified personal trainer and ACE certified personal trainer, NASM corrective exercise specialist, and pre-/post-natal certification.

Holy’s unique training style has been featured in several national media outlets, including CNN, “The Dr. Oz Show,” The Washington Post, Shape, and Men’s Fitness.

Glute kickback

Type of band: flat band

The glute kickback exercise helps strengthen the glute, hamstring, and core muscles.

  1. Start on your hands and knees, with hands under shoulders and feet hip-width apart. Wrap the resistance band around the arches of your feet.
  2. Keep your hands directly under your shoulders and back flat.
  3. Extend your right leg as far as possible behind you. Pause for a few seconds, then return to the starting position and repeat.
  4. Do 3 sets of 15 reps on each side.

Standing leg abduction

Type of band: flat band

The standing leg abduction targets the glutes and muscles of the hip. It also requires balance and core strength to perform correctly.

  1. Stand on the resistance band with your feet hip-width apart.
  2. Lift your right leg out to the side with your foot pointed forward. Make sure to engage your glutes as you lift your leg up and slowly bring your foot back to starting position.
  3. Keep the band wrapped around the middle of your foot and keep your hands in front of your abdominal area as you lift and lower your foot. Repeat.
  4. Do 3 sets of 15 reps on each side.

Side squat

Type of band: flat band

This move will strengthen your glutes and quads while helping to prevent injury by strengthening the muscles responsible for stabilizing your knees.

  1. Stand on the resistance band with your feet hip-width apart.
  2. Hold one end of the band in each hand.
  3. Squat and take a hip-width step to the side 10 times while remaining in the squat position and keeping the band tight in front of your abdominal area. Ensure your knees aren’t going over your toes.
  4. Do 10 side squats to each side. Repeat 2 times on each side.

Banded glute bridge

Type of band: mini band

Glute bridges engage your glutes as well as your core muscles and hamstrings.

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent, your feet hip-width apart, and the resistance band around the lower part of your quads, a few inches above your knees.
  2. Lift your hips off the floor and push your knees out slightly.
  3. Pause at the top of this move for 3 seconds, and then lower back to the starting position. Remember to engage your core, exhaling on the way up.
  4. Do 2 sets of 25 reps.

Bird dog

Type of band: mini band

The bird dog is an excellent move to add to any workout. When done correctly, it strengthens the lower back, glutes, core, and thighs.

  1. Start on your hands and knees with hands under shoulders, knees hip-width apart, and the resistance band around your quads.
  2. Reach your right arm forward and up as high as it can go as you simultaneously lift your left leg up behind you. You should feel the resistance in your glutes, and your core muscles should engage for stability.
  3. Keep your back flat and core engaged.
  4. Do 2 sets of 10 reps on each side.

Adding resistance bands to your overall fitness routine is a simple, safe, and affordable way to challenge your muscles, gain strength, and beat boredom.

Resistance bands allow you to create constant tension in the muscle when performing a move, which is different from traditional resistance training using dumbbells or barbells.

Plus, it’s easy to get started with this type of training. You can perform one or more of the routines listed above, or choose a few exercises from each to create a full-body workout.

The versatility of these resistance band workouts will surely keep you moving, even when you can’t get to a gym.



728x90-4

Source link

Comments


Leave a Reply


Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *