Thursday, September 16, 2021
The Best Muscle Workouts


The 12 Best Landmine Exercises for Building Muscle Mass and Strength – Fitness Volt

Functional training is something of a dirty word in most bodybuilding circles. More often than not, it’s a term used…

By admint10m , in Arms , at July 28, 2021

728x90-3

Functional training is something of a dirty word in most bodybuilding circles. More often than not, it’s a term used to describe exercises that are more circus skills than muscle builders and often involve using light dumbbells and while balancing precariously on one leg!

While this summation is not entirely true and somewhat unfair, it’s fair to say that a lot of so-called functional exercises are not very effective unless you actually ARE training to join the circus!

So Called Functional Exercises
(Photos via @t-nation)

That all changes when you break out a training device called a landmine. Most landmine exercises are functional and allow you to lift the kinds of weights you need to use to build strength and muscle mass.

That’s why landmines are so popular with athletes – they’re a great way to improve sports performance.

In this article, we reveal 12 of the best landmine exercises for your lower body, upper body, and core.

What Is A Landmine, And What Are the Benefits of Using One? 

A landmine is a sort of hinge into which you insert one end of a barbell. That leaves one end of the bar free to move, and it can be used for a wide range of exercises. In many ways, a landmine works a little like a T-bar row, but with no platform to stand on, you can use it for many more exercises.

Landmines can move through 360 degrees, allowing for multidirectional movements. It’s this feature that makes landmine training so functional, which just means landmine training has an excellent carryover to everyday and sporting movements.

In contrast, some free weight and most machine-based exercises are often described as non-functional, as they don’t replicate everyday movements. After all, when was the last time you did anything close to a leg extension or leg curl outside of the gym?

Landmine

Landmines can be used singularly or in pairs and are useful for developing all fitness components, including strength, power, endurance, and muscle hypertrophy. They’re handy for developing balance and eliminating left-to-right strength imbalances.

Because the weight travels in an arc, a lot of landmine exercises are more joint-friendly than their free weight and machine alternatives. That’s especially true for overhead presses.

Some power racks have a built-in landmine station, and they can also be bought as stand-alone stations with large, heavy baseplates or designed to be weighed down with weight plates.

Landmine Attachment

No landmine? No problem! A lot of the exercises in this article can be done by putting one end of a barbell in a corner. While not ideal, this is a viable option if you can’t get your hands on an actual landmine station.

With many landmine exercises, you just grip the end of the bar with one or both hands. However, there are also handles available that can add variety to your workouts.

The 12 Best Landmine Exercises 

Got a landmine but not sure how to start using it? Here are 12 of the best landmine exercises. As always, spend a few minutes warming up before your workout, and start light to prevent accidents and injury.

1. Landmine Goblet Squat

Goblet squats are a great way to strengthen and condition your lower body while perfecting your squatting mechanics.

Typically done with a single kettlebell or dumbbell, the landmine version may be even better because it forces you to push your hips back as you descend and then drive them forward again as you stand back up. This increases posterior chain activation.

How to do it:

  1. Lift the end of the bar and hold it in front of your chest with your hands close together, both palms facing inward. Stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart, toes turned slightly outward. Brace your core and pull your shoulders down and back.
  2. Push your hips back and squat down until your thighs are roughly parallel to the floor. Take care NOT to round your lower back.
  3. Stand up explosively and repeat.

 

2. Landmine Lateral Squat

Lateral squats are an excellent exercise for people who play sports as they develop your ability to move sideways, as you would when trying to dodge an opponent. As well as working your quadriceps, glutes, and hamstrings, this functional move also involves your hip adductors and abductors.

How to do it:

  1. Lift the end of the bar and hold it in front of your chest with your hands close together, both palms facing inward. Stand with your feet together. Brace your core and pull your shoulders down and back.
  2. Take a large step to the left, bend your left knee, and squat down until your left thigh is roughly parallel to the floor. Your right leg should remain relatively straight.
  3. Push hard off your left leg and return to your starting position.
  4. Do another rep on your left side or swap legs and alternate as preferred.

 

3. Landmine Thrusters

Landmine thrusters add an upper-body component to goblet squats, making it a great full-body strength and power exercise. Done with light weights for high reps, this is an excellent conditioning exercise.

How to do it:

  1. Lift the end of the bar and hold it in front of your chest with your hands close together, both palms facing inward. Stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart, toes turned slightly outward. Brace your core and pull your shoulders down and back.
  2. Push your hips back and squat down until your thighs are roughly parallel to the floor. Take care NOT to round your lower back.
  3. Stand up explosively and use this momentum to help you drive the weight up and overhead to arms’ length.
  4. Lower the bar back to your shoulders and repeat.

 

4. Single Leg Landmine Romanian Deadlift

Single-leg deadlifts are an excellent unilateral posterior chain exercise, but balance can be a problem for some people, making them hard to do without lots of wobbles. Doing this exercise with a landmine increases stability, so you can focus more on the movement and less on maintaining your balance.

How to do it: 

  1. Stand at 90-degrees to the end of your landmine bar. Pick it up and hold it in your nearest hand, using an overhand grip. Stand on the leg furthest from the landmine, knee slightly bent. Keep your arm down by your aside.
  2. Hinging from your hips, lean forward as far as your flexibility allows and without rounding your lower back. Extend your other leg out behind you as a counterbalance.
  3. Stand back up and repeat.
  4. Rest, swap sides, and do the same number of reps on the other leg.

 

5. Landmine Reverse Suitcase Lunge

Suitcase reverse lunges work not only your legs but your core too. The name comes from holding a weight in one hand down by your side like you are carrying a bag. Reverse lunges are generally more knee-friendly than forward lunges and are also a great way to target your posterior chain.

How to do it: 

  1. Stand at 90-degrees to the end of your landmine bar. Pick it up and hold it in your nearest hand, using an overhand grip. Keep your arm down by your aside.
  2. Step back with the leg furthest from the bar. Bend both legs and lower your rearmost knee down to within an inch of the floor.
  3. Push off your back leg and bring your feet back together.
  4. Do the required number of reps, swap sides, and repeat.

 

6. Landmine Half-kneeling Press

Like all overhead pressing exercises, the landmine half-kneeling press works your deltoids and triceps. However, this unusual body position also increases core activation and removes your legs from the equation, making it a much more challenging exercise.

How to do it:

  1. Kneel at the end of your landmine bar with your left leg forward and your right leg back. Both knees should be bent to 90-degrees. Hold the end of the bar at shoulder height in your right hand, with your palm facing inward.
  2. Brace your core and make sure your torso is perfectly vertical. Do not lean to the side.
  3. Press the bar up and slightly forward, leaning into the movement.
  4. Lower your hand back to your shoulder and repeat.
  5. Rest a moment, swap sides, and repeat.

 

7. Landmine Shoulder to Shoulder Press

This shoulder, triceps, and core exercise involves a bit more coordination than the average overhead pressing exercise. It’s a great way to shake up your upper body training. Add a bit of extra leg thrust to make it a push-press for variety.

How to do it:

  1. Lift the bar and hold it in front of your chest with your hands close together, both palms facing inward. Stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart, abs braced, and shoulders down and back.
  2. Press the weight straight up and above your head.
  3. Bend your arms and lower the bar down and across to one shoulder.
  4. Push it back up, and then lower it to the opposite shoulder.
  5. Alternate shoulders for the duration of your set.

 

8. Landmine Meadows Row

John Meadows is a well-known bodybuilder and professional strength coach. He invented this unique back builder, which is named after him. While similar to single-arm rows, the angle of movement is unusual, which is what makes this exercise is so beneficial.

How to do it:

  1. Stand at 90-degrees to the end of your landmine bar. Pick it up and hold it in your nearest hand, using an overhand grip. Adopt a staggered stance, with the leg nearest the bar toward the rear. Place your non-working on your front thigh for support.
  2. Keeping your elbow out to the side, row the end of the bar up to the side of your chest.
  3. Extend your arm and repeat.
  4. Do the same number of reps on both arms.

 

9. Landmine T-bar Row with a Towel Grip

No T-bar row available? Don’t worry; you can do a very similar back-building movement using a landmine. T-bar rows are often done using a narrow V handle, but for this exercise, you’re going to use a gym towel instead. This is an excellent exercise for building not just a bigger, more muscular back but a stronger grip too.

How to do it:

  1. Stand astride your landmine bar with your back to the pivot point. Put a gym towel under the bar and then grab the ends.
  2. With your feet roughly shoulder-width apart, hinge forward from your hips, so your torso is set to about 45-degrees. Your arms should be straight, while your knees should be slightly bent. Brace your core.
  3. Without rounding your lower back, bend your arms and row the bar upward until your elbows are extended behind your torso. Squeeze your shoulders back.
  4. Extend your arms and repeat.

 

10. Single-Arm Landmine Row

While there is nothing wrong with dumbbell single-arm rows, using a landmine changes the movement slightly, which may be useful for adding variety to your back workouts.

How to do it:

  1. Stand next to your landmine bar with the pivot point behind you. With your knees slightly bent, lean forward and grab the bar with your nearest hand, using a neutral or palms in grip.
  2. Without rounding your lower back, row the weight up and into the side of your ribs. Keep your hips and shoulders square and level.
  3. Extend your arm and repeat.
  4. Rest and moment, and then do a set on the other side. Try to do the same number of reps with both arms.

11. Landmine Full-contact Twist

Core exercises don’t come much more complete than landmine full-contact twist. They work your rectus abdominus, obliques, and transverse abdominus, and your delts get a good workout too. Go light and focus on pushing the landmine bar forward and down. Only add weight when you know you’ve perfected your technique.

How to do it:

  1. Lift the bar and hold it above your head with your hands close together, both palms facing inward. Brace your core and pull your shoulders down and back. Press the bar forward and down
  2. Maintaining core tension, turn your shoulders and arms and lower the landmine bar down to one side. Turn your hips in the same direction as your arms.
  3. Raise the weight back up and then repeat on the opposite side.
  4. Continue alternating sides for the duration of your set, pushing your arms forward and down the entire time.

12. Landmine Rollouts

While barbell rollouts are an excellent midsection exercise, they only really work your abs in one direction. With this landmine variation, the bar moves in an arc, which increases oblique activation. Swap sides set by set to make sure you work your abs from both directions.

How to do it:

  1. With a weight plate on your landmine, kneel down at 90-degrees to the bar. Grip the and with both hands and using an overhand grip. Brace your abs.
  2. Keeping your arms straight, roll the bar out and away from you until your chest is just a few inches off the floor.
  3. Pull the bar back to your legs and repeat.
  4. Rest a moment, swap sides, and repeat.

Best Landmine Exercises – Wrapping Up

Bodybuilding and functional training are often seen as being on opposite sides of the workout spectrum. And while bodybuilding is more about aesthetics than performance, that doesn’t mean you can’t be muscular and move well too. Check out athletes like wrestlers and Olympic weightlifters for inspiration.

Landmine training is one way to build muscle and enhance athletic performance at the same time. Using a landmine develops balance and coordination while overloading your muscles, and most exercises done with this particular training tool also provide your core with a great workout.

You don’t have to go all landmine all the time; that would probably be overkill. But, adding some upper body, lower body, and core landmine exercises to your training week will do you nothing but good. And remember, you don’t even need a landmine device to do these exercises; just shove one end of your barbell in a corner, and you’re good to go!

728x90-4

Source link

Comments


Leave a Reply


Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *